City of Victoria: 2022 – Q4

As part of our ongoing Open VicPD transparency initiative, we introduced Community Safety Report Cards as a way to keep everyone up to date with how the Victoria Police Department is serving the public.  These report cards, which are published quarterly in two community-specific versions (one for Victoria and one for Esquimalt), offer both quantitative and qualitative information about crime trends, operational incidents, and community engagement initiatives.  It is hoped that, through this proactive sharing of information, our citizens have a better understanding of how VicPD is working toward its strategic vision of “A Safer Community Together.

Description

Charts (Victoria)

Calls for Service (Victoria)

Call for Service (CFS) are requests for services from, or reports to the police department that generate any action on the part of the police department or partner agency performing work on behalf of the police department (such as E-Comm 9-1-1).

CFS include recording a crime/incident for reporting purposes. CFS are not generated for proactive activities unless the officer generates a specific CFS report.

The types of calls are broken into six main categories: social order, violence, property, traffic, assist, and other.  For a list of calls within each of these call categories, please click here.

Annual trends show a decrease in total CFS in 2019 and 2020. Since January 2019, abandoned calls, which are included in the total number of calls and can often generate a police response, are no longer captured by the E-Comm 911/Police Dispatch Centre in the same way. This has significantly reduced the total number of CFS.  Also, policy changes with regard to abandoned 911 calls from cell phones occurred in July 2019, further reducing these CFS totals.  Additional factors that have reduced the number of 911 calls include increased education and changes to cell phone design so that emergency calls could no longer be activated by a one-button push.

These important changes are reflected in the following abandoned 911 call figures, which are included in the displayed CFS totals and are largely responsible for the recent decrease in total CFS:

2016 = 8,409
2017 = 7,576
2018 = 8,554
2019 = 4,411
2020 = 1,296

Victoria Total Calls for Service – By Category, Quarterly

Source: VicPD

Victoria Total Calls for Service – By Category, Annually

Source: VicPD

VicPD Jurisdiction Calls for Service – Quarterly

Source: VicPD

VicPD Jurisdiction Calls for Service – Annually

Source: VicPD

Crime Incidents – VicPD Jurisdiction

Number of Crime Incidents (VicPD Jurisdiction)

  • Violent Crime Incidents
  • Property Crime Incidents
  • Other Crime Incidents

These charts reflect the most available data from Statistics Canada. The charts will be updated when new data is available.

Crime Incidents – VicPD Jurisdiction

Source: Statistics Canada

Response Time (Victoria)

Response time is defined as the time that elapses between the time a call is received to the time the first officer arrives on scene.

Charts reflect median response times for the following Priority One and Priority Two calls in Victoria.

Response Time – Victoria

Source: VicPD
NOTE: Times are displayed in minutes and second. For example, “8.48” indicates 8 minutes and 48 seconds.

Crime Rate (Victoria)

The crime rate, as published by Statistics Canada, is the number of Criminal Code violations (excluding traffic offences) per 100,000 population.

  • Total Crime (excluding traffic)
  • Violent Crime
  • Property Crime
  • Other Crime

Data Updated | For all data up to and including 2019, Statistics Canada reported VicPD’s data for its combined jurisdiction of Victoria and Esquimalt. Beginning in 2020, StatsCan is separating that data for both communities. Therefore, the charts for 2020 do not display data for past years as direct comparisons are not possible with this change of methodology. As data is added over successive years, however, year-to-year trends will be displayed.

These charts reflect the most available data from Statistics Canada. The charts will be updated when new data is available.

Crime Rate – Victoria

Source: Statistics Canada

Crime Severity Index (Victoria & Esquimalt)

The crime severity index (CSI), as published by Statistics Canada, measures both the volume and severity of police-reported crime in Canada.  In the index, all crimes are assigned a weight by Statistics Canada based on their seriousness.  The level of seriousness is based on actual sentences handed down by the courts in all provinces and territories.

This chart shows the CSI for all municipal police services in BC as well as the provincial average for all police services.  For VicPD’s jurisdiction, the CSI for the City of Victoria and the Township of Esquimalt are shown separately, which is a feature that was first introduced with the release of 2020 data.  For historic CSI figures that show combined CSI data for VicPD’s jurisdiction of both Victoria and Esquimalt, click here VicPD 2019 Crime Severity Index (CSI).

These charts reflect the most available data from Statistics Canada. The charts will be updated when new data is available.

Crime Severity Index – Victoria & Esquimalt

Source: Statistics Canada

Crime Severity Index (Non-Violent) – Victoria & Esquimalt

Source: Statistics Canada

Crime Severity Index (Violent) – Victoria & Esquimalt

Source: Statistics Canada

Weighted Clearance Rate (Victoria)

Clearance rates represent the proportion of criminal incidents solved by the police.

Data Updated | For all data up to and including 2019, Statistics Canada reported VicPD’s data for its combined jurisdiction of Victoria and Esquimalt. Beginning in 2020 data, StatsCan is separating that data for both communities. Therefore, the charts for 2020 do not display data for past years as direct comparisons are not possible with this change of methodology. As data is added over successive years, however, year-to-year trends will be displayed.

These charts reflect the most available data from Statistics Canada. The charts will be updated when new data is available.

Weighted Clearance Rate – Victoria

Source: Statistics Canada

Perception of Crime (Victoria)

Community and business survey data from 2021 as well as past community surveys: “Do you think that crime in Victoria has increased, decreased or remained the same during the last 5 years?”

Perception of Crime  – Victoria

Source: VicPD

Block Watch (Victoria)

This chart shows the numbers of active blocks in the VicPD Block Watch program.

Block Watch – Victoria

Source: VicPD

Public Satisfaction (Victoria)

Public satisfaction with VicPD (community and business survey data from 2021 as well as past community surveys): “Overall, how satisfied are you with the work of the Victoria Police?”

Public Satisfaction – Victoria

Source: VicPD

Perception of Accountability (Victoria)

Perception of accountability of VicPD officers from community and business survey data from 2021 as well as past community surveys: “Based on your own personal experience, or what you may have read or heard, please indicate whether you agree or disagree that the Victoria Police is accountable.”

Perception of Accountability – Victoria

Source: VicPD

Documents Released to the Public

These charts show the number of community updates (news releases) and reports published, as well the number of Freedom of Information (FOI) requests that are released.

Documents Released to the Public

Source: VicPD

FOI Documents Released

Source: VicPD

Overtime Costs (VicPD)

  • Investigation and specialized units (This includes investigations, specialized units, protests and other)
  • Staff shortage (Cost associated with replacing absent staff, normally for last minute injury or illness)
  • Statutory holiday (Mandatory overtime costs for staff working Statutory Holidays)
  • Recovered (This is related to special duties and overtime for seconded specialty units where all costs are recovered from outside funding resulting in no additional cost to VicPD)

Overtime Costs (VicPD) in dollars ($)

Source: VicPD

Public Safety Campaigns (VicPD)

The number of public safety campaigns initiated by VicPD and those local, regional, or national campaigns supported by, but not necessarily initiated by VicPD.

Public Safety Campaigns (VicPD)

Source: VicPD

Police Act Complaints (VicPD)

Total files opened by the Professional Standards office. Open files do not necessarily result in an investigation of any type. (Source: Office of the Police Complaints Commissioner)

  • Admissible registered complaints (complaints resulting in a formal Police Act investigation)
  • Number of reported substantiated investigations (Police Act investigations that resulted in one or more counts of misconduct being established)

Police Act Complaints (VicPD)

Source: Office of the Police Complaint Commissioner of BC
NOTE: Dates are provincial government fiscal year (April 1 to March 31) i.e. “2020” indicates April 1, 2019 to March 31, 2020.

Case Load per Officer (VicPD)

The average number of criminal files assigned to each officer.  The average is calculated by dividing the total number of files by the authorized strength of the police Department (Source: Police Resources in BC, Province of British Columbia).

This chart reflects the latest data available. The charts will be updated when new data is available.

Case Load per Officer (VicPD)

Source: Police Resources in BC

Time Loss in Shifts (VicPD)

VicPD’s operational effectiveness can be, and has been, affected by having employees unable to work. The loss of time recorded in this chart includes both physical and mental health injuries which occur in the workplace. This does not include time lost for off-duty injury or illness, parental leave, or leaves of absence. This chart shows this time loss in terms of shifts lost by both officers and civilian employees by calendar year.

Time Loss in Shifts (VicPD)

Source: VicPD

Deployable Officers (% of total strength)

This is the percentage of officers who are fully deployable to policing duties with no restrictions.

Please note: This is a Point-in-Time calculation each year, as the actual number fluctuates widely throughout the year.

Deployable Officers (% of total strength)

Source: VicPD

Volunteer / Reserve Constable Hours (VicPD)

This is the number of volunteer hours annually performed by volunteers and Reserve Constables.

Volunteer / Reserve Constable Hours (VicPD)

Source: VicPD

Training Hours per Officer (VicPD)

Average training hours is calculated by the total number of hours of training divided by the authorized strength.  All training is accounted for including training related to specialized positions such as the Emergency Response Team, and off-duty training required under the Collective Agreement.

Training Hours per Officer (VicPD)

Source: VicPD

Source: VicPD

Victoria Community Information

VicPD continues to make progress towards our three main strategic goals outlined in VicPD Strategic Plan 2020. Specifically, in Q3, the following goal-specific work was accomplished:

Support Community Safety

VicPD ensured public safety at a number of large-scale community events, including Canada Day celebrations and Deuce Days.

VicPD investigators disrupted several significant frauds during the quarter, include a rental scam fraud with numerous victims and a financial fraud scheme that resulted in 85 recommended charges.

VicPD volunteers and officers helped keep returning students safe by conducting a back to school Speed Watch blitz at every school in Victoria and Esquimalt during the month of September.

Enhance Public Trust

The Saanich shooting incident, despite its associated tragedies, also served to bring our community closer together as demonstrated through the Victoria Shamrocks “Stronger Together” appreciation event in July. This event raised over $10,000 for the Victoria City Police Athletic Association, creating future opportunities for VicPD officers and staff to connect with young people through athletics, academics and art.

VicPD held an interactive “Ask Me Anything” online session that shared information about impaired driving and what VicPD is doing to address it. With over 20,000 views online and hundreds of likes and comments, this engagement helped keep people stay informed and educated on the risks of driving impaired.

VicPD updated its online VicPD Community Dashboard with new Statistics Canada data related to the Crime Severity Index. This data is now available for both Victoria and Esquimalt and includes detail on the overall Crime Severity Index for both communities, as well as sub-indices that show violent and non-violent data.

Achieve Organizational Excellence

In Q3, an increased emphasis was placed on attracting qualified candidates to join VicPD as officers, civilian employees, special municipal constables, jail staff, and volunteers. This has taken the form of a recruiting presence at community and sporting events as well as a refreshed recruiting website and a streamlined application process.

A working group continues to address the findings of the recent Mental Health and Wellbeing Survey and key action items are being implemented, including the launch of a new Peer Support Team and the establishment of contracted positions for an in-house psychologist and an occupational health nurse.

Work continues to develop and implement a departmental re-organization to better align available resources with ongoing and future operational needs.

A July 9th early morning impaired driving incident on Dallas Road saw a woman arrested and a vehicle removed from a pond a significant distance from the road way. Luckily, no one was physically injured in the incident.

An impaired driver’s vehicle left the road and ended up in a pond of Dallas Road

Statistics Canada released the 2021 Crime Severity Index (CSI). This is the second year that Statistics Canada has released crime data measures that separate out Victoria and Esquimalt. Victoria remained in the highest spot for municipal police services with a CSI of 148, well above BC’s average of 93. Esquimalt’s CSI remains significantly below BC’s average at 45.

July saw officers respond to multiple calls in which they ended up seizing loaded firearms from residences and from vehicles. On July 15th, Patrol officers responded to a report that a stolen vehicle had been located at a multi-unit residential housing facility in the 700-block of Queens Avenue. Officers arrived, located the vehicle and discovered a loaded shotgun and ammunition inside. The search for the suspect led to a barricaded person call, with the Greater Victoria Emergency Response Team responding and taking two into custody.

Five days later, on July 20th, a traffic stop at Douglas and Discovery streets led to Patrol officers recovering both a realistic replica firearm and a loaded handgun. Two people were arrested, transported to cells and held in custody for breaching a sentencing condition not to possess both real and replica weapons.

The following week, a road rage investigation led officers to recover a loaded shotgun. Officers stopped a vehicle in the 2900-block of Douglas Street as part of a investigation into a road rage incident when they learned the driver of the vehicle had a driving prohibition stemming from a series of previous criminal convictions for a variety of offences, which include firearm offences. In addition to the driving prohibition, the driver also has an indefinite firearms possession ban. Officers performed a security search prior to towing the vehicle and located a loaded shotgun inside. The driver was arrested and later released pending further investigation.

Deuce Days returned to Victoria’s Inner Habour in July for the 90th anniversary of this classic car event. Tens of thousands of spectators attended the event to take in the over 1,000 pre-1952 vehicles that took to Victoria’s streets.

Officers help keep the crowd safe during Deuce Days

Officers executed a search warrant and seized firearms, body armour and additional weapons after executing a search warrant at a suite in a multi-unit supportive housing facility in the 800-block of Johnson Street. In addition to a shotgun and two handguns, officers located several replica firearms, brass knuckles, a taser, a sword and batons. Two people were arrested.

The family of Jeremy Gordaneer, along with the Vancouver Island Integrated Major Crime Unit (VIIMCU), appealed for information to assist with the investigation into Jeremy’s homicide in August of 2021. CED worked with investigators and Jeremy’s sister, Alisa, and his daughters, Clea and Sylvie, to create a video appealing for those with information to come forward.

Jeremy Gordaneer’s family appeal for answers in his murder

A man was arrested and then apprehended under the Mental Health Act after a report that he threw rocks through the windows of a government building and attempted a carjacking on August 24th. When officers arrived, the man challenged them to a fight and was taken into custody with the assistance of a conducted energy weapon or taser. After taking the man into custody, he made several statements that made officers concerned for his safety and well-being. Officers transported the man to hospital.

Officers had to again deploy a conducted energy weapon to arrest a man who randomly stabbed a stranger in the chest on August 31st. The victim told officers the man approached him and demanded a cigarette. When the victim declined, the man suddenly stabbed the victim in the chest. The victim fled and was pursued by his attacker who only fled the area when a witness yelled that they were calling the police. The suspect brandished the knife and advanced towards responding officers who took him into custody at gunpoint after successfully deploying the conducted energy weapon.

Officers with the Greater Victoria Emergency Response Team had to utilize a noise-making device, pepper spray, and conducted energy weapon and bean bag rounds after hours of negotiation failed to disarm an armed person near a Cook Street Village playground. Upon taking the person into custody, officers learned they had non-life-threatening injuries to their arms. They were treated by a VicPD Tactical Emergency Medical Support (TEMS) medic until BC Emergency Health Services paramedics took over care.

Major Crime Unit investigators began working to identify and locate a suspect after a person was randomly attacked and stabbed multiple times in the 1000-block of Pandora Avenue on Thursday, September 15th. The victim’s injuries were initially potentially life-threatening and it was only after emergency medical care that their injuries were considered non-life-threatening. The victim had been sitting on a bench when they were randomly attacked from behind by a stranger, and only discovered they had been stabbed after fleeing to safety.

While a VicPD Forensic Identification Services (FIS) officer was processing the stabbing scene, he was randomly attacked by a man wielding a skateboard. The attacker swung the skateboard at the FIS officer’s head and was fought off by the officer, who used his camera to deflect the blows and defend himself. Nearby Patrol officers, who were conducting scene security, immediately responded and helped take the suspect into custody. Upon arresting the suspect, officers learned that the man had outstanding warrants and transported to VicPD cells. The FIS officer completed documenting the scene with a different camera.

The next morning officers arrested two people after a man was shot at a multi-unit residential temporary housing facility in the 3000-block of Douglas Street. The victim suffered a non-life-threatening, but potentially life-altering injury to their lower limb. A short time later, officers located two suspects and arrested them at another multi-unit residential temporary housing facility.

Two significant fraud investigations were brought to the public’s attention. On August 27th Patrol officers were called to a vehicle dealership in the 3000-block of Douglas Street after an employee grew suspicious when a customer applied for over $50,000 in financing using what appeared to be fraudulent means. Officers arrested the man after a short foot chase. The investigation resulted in 85 recommended charges including charges for identity theft, procuring and trafficking government documents, fraud over $5000, obstruction of a police officer and 79 different breaches of various court-ordered conditions.

Community Services Division officers uncovered and then disrupted a series of rental scams throughout downtown Victoria, arresting two suspects. Officers executed a search warrant during the investigation and disrupted a potential fraud in progress. These frauds were marked by being particularly brazen, with the fraudsters meeting with potential victims in short-term vacation rentals that they were listing as long-term rental accommodations online. The fraudsters called victims’ references, had victims sign phony rental contracts and issued false key fobs. These files remain under investigation, with investigators appealing for additional victims to come forward.

Do you recognize this rental fraud suspect?

VicPD volunteers and VicPD Traffic officers helped keep returning Esquimalt and Victoria students safe by conducting a back to school Speed Watch blitz.

VicPD Speed Watch investigators at South Park Elementary School

VicPD Speed Watch volunteers conducted speed watch in school zones every school day in September including deploying to high-concern areas in both Victoria and Esquimalt.

VicPD Speed Watch volunteers with Esquimalt Mayor Barbara Desjardins and School District 61 Board Chair Ryan Painter

2022’s Q3 began as both VicPD and Saanich PD continued to recover from the shooting at the Bank of Montreal in which six members of the Greater Victoria Emergency Response Team (GVERT) were shot and wounded. Canada Day’s operations saw 20 Vancouver Police Department officers join officers from across Greater Victoria as Victoria once again hosted Canada Day celebrations. In response to ongoing safety concerns and an outpouring of emotion, VicPD’s Community Engagement Division (CED) created the #GVERT Blue Heart campaign. Beginning on Canada Day, VicPD officers, staff and volunteers, as well as officers with the Greater Victoria Public Safety Unit (PSU) handed out over 10,000 #GVERT Blue Hearts, thanking the community for their support.

PSU officers on Canada Day

VicPD’s Community Engagement Division continued to support efforts to attract volunteers, civilian staff, new officer recruits and experienced officers. In addition to a recruiting-centred relaunch of VicPD.ca, efforts this year have included in-person engagements, social media outreach and banners on the building at 850 Caledonia Avenue. A recruiting-focussed Instagram reel has garnered over 750 likes and over 22,000 views.

VicPD’s Community Engagement Team partnered with VicPD’s Traffic Section on an extensive Ask Me Anything (AMA) about impaired driving during an ICBC impaired driving counter attack roadblock on July 8th in Vic West. In addition to identifying impaired drivers, VicPD Traffic officer Cst. Stephen Pannekoek answered questions from the public ranging from “is it okay to be nervous at a roadblock?” to “what would happen if a driver refused to answer questions & only provided license/reg info?”. With over 20,000 views online and hundreds of likes and comments, this engagement helped keep people informed and educated on the risks of driving impaired.

Chief Del Manak, Deputy Chief Jason Laidman and Inspector Kerrilee Jones were all glad to go behind the counter under the watchful guidance of some Tim Hortons’ vets in support of youth programs at Tim Hortons Camp Day.


VicPD joined the Victoria Harbour Cats for two events supporting our officers and connecting with the Greater Victoria baseball community. Chief Manak threw out the first pitch and we were invited back for #GVERT blue heart day, where the Harbour Cats wore their VicPD-themed 3rd jersey.

VicPD’s Blue Socks baseball team played in the Michael Dunahee Tournament of Hope in support of Child Find BC. Although the team lost in a nail-biter, we’re glad to be part of this important event supporting the Dunahees and helping keep kids and families safe.

We were honoured to continue our relationship with the Aboriginal Coalition to End Homelessness. This year’s Annual General Meeting was held at the Songhees Wellness Centre and both the Songhees and Esquimalt Nations outlined the work they and the Coalition are doing. We’re proud to continue to partner in their great work.

VicPD was proud to participate in the march from George Jay School to commemorate 100 years since the Chinese Students Strike Against Segregation, honouring the courage of Chinese students and their parents as they stood up to racism.

We were honoured to see our soon-to-be launched canoe blessed as part of our ongoing work to navigate the path of reconciliation. The Pulling Together Canoe journey has been an important part of the journey we are taking together with the Esquimalt and Songhees Nations and the blessing of our canoe is brings us ever closer to being able to deepen our connections.

The family-friendly atmosphere with great music, food and energy at Festival Mexicano in Centennial Square saw many connections between Greater Victoria’s Mexican community and VicPD.

VicPD was proud to be a special ribbon cutting ceremony at the Topaz Gurdwara with Premier John Horgan to unveil the upgrades largely due to a provincial grant. A real team effort and partnership. The remodeling looks great!

Connecting with kids is a key part of our engagements, so that they learn police officers can be safe adults when they need help. We were glad to use a little lights and sirens to connect with over 40 youth at the Kids Gurmat Camp at the Gurdwara.

A key event this quarter was VicPD’s partnership with the Victoria Shamrocks in recognition of officers’ valour during the BMO shooting in Saanich. Following a pre-game tailgate picnic supported by Bank of Montreal, Saanich Police Department Chief Dean Duthie and VicPD Chief Del Manak were invited to speak to the Shamrocks crowd and thank Greater Victoria for their support for police officers across the region.

BMO staff were part of the pre-game tailgate picnic for VicPD and Saanich PD officers and staff

VicPD Chief Manak thanks Greater Victoria for the outpouring of support

Integrated Canine Service Sgt. Ewer explains what Police Service Dog Maverick likes for treats

The event featured a demo by the Integrated Canine Service, a “LeQuesne and LeQuesne” Q&A with VicPD Cst. Eric LeQuesne and his father (radio host Cliff LeQuesne) and many warm moments that helped bring the community together in the spirit of healing.

Cst. Eric LeQuesne, Police Service Dog Obi, and The Q’s Cliff LeQuesne

The event raised over $10,000 for the Victoria City Police Athletic Association, creating future opportunities for VicPD officers and staff to connect with young people through athletics, academics and art.

Q3 closed with VicPD’s flag being included in the circle at the Songhees Nation South Island Powwow in Royal Athletic Park at the end of September. We were honoured to be part of the day, which celebrated Indigenous vibrant resiliency and forges the path forward for all committed to reconciliation.

For more notable files, please visit our community updates page.

At the end of Q3 the net operating financial position is approximately 0.25% over budget due to annual wage increases exceeding expectations, increases to WorkSafe BC premiums and high overtime costs in the first two quarters due to front line staffing shortages, which have since improved. Revenues are above budget due to recoveries of expenditures for special duties. Capital commitments are in line with expectations and are expected to remain within budget. Software licensing costs are also in excess of budget, but are offset by lower communications and supply costs. Overall the net financial position is a minor deficit at this time.